Category Archives: event

2018 MENNELLO MUSEUM INVITATIONAL

January 19 – March 2, 2018

Opening on January 19, 2018, the second annual Mennello Museum Invitational will again highlight new work by contemporary regional artists whose work enriches our community and our lives in Central Florida.  The Mennello Museum Invitational serves to support our local artists, provide visibility for their work and introduce them to new collectors while giving our community an amazing opportunity to build their collection of art.

This group exhibition will be on view in the museum’s Marilyn Gallery from January 19 through March 2, 2018. and will serve as a heart-filled embrace of our creative community.  The public opening will be celebrated on January 19, 2018, with an Opening Reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. It is a great opportunity to see some incredible local artwork right out of the studios.

All work in the Mennello Museum Invitational will also be featured and available for purchase at the Evening with Fabulous Friends Gala on March 3, 2018.  The artists have generously donated 50% of their proceeds to benefit the Mennello Museum.

The 2018 selected artists include Weronica Ankarörn, Stephen Bach, Susan Bach, Matthew Cornell, Genevieve DeMarco, Todd Fox, Peterson J. Guerrier, Saulius Jankauskas, Martha Lent, Anne Mayer, Roland Rockwood, Andrew Spear, Lillian Verkins, and Vickie Wilson.

The Mennello Museum Invitational is curated by Paul T. Scarborough, Shannon Fitzgerald, and Katherine Navarro as an invitation to artists to present work in a group exhibition while supporting both the museum and the artists.

 


OPENING RECEPTION

The Mennello Museum Invitational and GRACE HARTIGAN 1960-1965, THE PERRY COLLECTION:

Preview & Opening Reception
Friday, January 19, 2018

Members-only Preview
5:30 – 6:30 pm

Public Opening Reception
Free for members | $10 for Guests
6:30 – 8:30 pm

 

 


 

 

Art Credit:
Lillian Verkins, Five Palms, 2016, acrylic.
Vickie Wilson, Flower, 2017, acrylic on canvas.
Roland P. Rockwood, SOUBIROUS IV: The Imperial Prosecutor of Lourdes, 2017, acrylic, aluminum, reflective mylar, newsprint, pastel on wood panel with frame.
Andrew Spear, The Truth, 2017, acrylic and paint pen on canvas.

 

GRACE HARTIGAN 1960-1965, THE PERRY COLLECTION

January 19, 2018 – March 18, 2018

GRACE HARTIGAN 1960-1965, THE PERRY COLLECTION presents a rare selection of paintings and collages that represent Hartigan’s noted Abstract Expressionist style as it evolved in the early 1960s toward new levels of abstraction and representation. Long overlooked, Hartigan was a key innovator among the painters of the New York School.

Hartigan’s reputation as an important contemporary artist increased throughout the 1950s; she was the only woman represented in the much heralded MoMA’s 1956 show Twelve Americans that included Sam Francis, Philip Guston, Franz Kline, and Seymour Lipton; and her work was an integral part of MoMA’s New American Painting exhibition that toured eight countries in Europe in 1958 and 1959 and included Jackson Pollock, William de Kooning, Mark Rothko, Franz Kline, Barnett Newman, Robert Motherwell, Arshile Gorky, Clifford Still, and other leading Abstract Expressionist painters.  She was the only woman artist in both exhibitions.

More recently, Hartigan has been included in survey exhibitions looking at Abstract Expressionism from the lens of the 21st Century including: Abstract Expressionist New York at MoMA, 2010 that celebrated the achievements of a generation that catapulted New York City to the center of the international art world nearly seventy years ago and the groundbreaking exhibition Women of Abstract Expressionism organized by Denver Art Museum, 2016 that celebrated the often unknown female artists of this mid-twentieth-century art movement.

Hartigan is likewise noted for her influence on three generations, during her more than 40 years teaching graduate students as director of Maryland Institute College of Art’s (MICA) Hoffberger School of Painting, Baltimore.

The variety of paintings in this exhibition range from 1960 – 1965, and they are assembled by Hartigan’s Washington D.C. dealer, the late Beatrice Perry.  They are characteristic of Hartigan’s style at the time, a style of vivid color and texture painted on a large scale.

Similar works of this period are found in the collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Albright Knox Art Gallery, and the Peggy Guggenheim Collection in Venice, Italy.  The selection also demonstrates the shift in mood and thought as Hartigan transitioned from her studio and work life in New York to Baltimore, Maryland where she lived, painted, and thought until her death in 2008.

I think the thing about Hartigan that I admired the most is her purposefulness in her work. No matter the economic realities or the ebb and flow of the art world she had a plan for her work and she stuck to it. Her journals are very useful when it comes to learning about her thoughts and ideas as well as the day to day struggles to make ends meet while trying to paint and build a career in New York in the 50s.

—Michael Klein, Guest Curator, New York


Grace Hartigan, Reisterstown Mall, 1965, oil on canvas, 80 x 102 inches.  Collection of Hart Perry.

Free Family Funday

Sponsored by

Every second Sunday of the month is Free Family Funday!

Join us at the museum for free admission, a free miniature fine art project and free docent touring.  Each Free Family Funday has a different theme based on the current exhibition in the museum.

Miniature fine art project and docent touring is available 12-2:30 p.m.  The museum galleries stay open until 4:30 p.m. for all guests.


Sunday, February 11

Abstract Expressionism
Use your imagination to create a colorful, mixed media painting collage using the methods of Grace Hartigan. Take inspiration from her works on paper in the galleries side by side with her large canvas paintings. Then, rip your artwork to pieces to create a second masterpiece exploring the themes of abstraction.

UPCOMING

March 11 — 12:00 pm – 2:30 pm

Movies at The Mennello: A Documentary Film Screening Series

Our film screening series will continue to bring you interesting documentaries and thoughtful films by artists. Don’t have time to enjoy the museum during normal business hours? Come in early and experience the exhibits at your own pace before settling in for popcorn, drinks and a movie.
Extended hours: 4:30 – 6 p.m.
Film: 6 p.m.

Admission: $5 for Guests, Free for Members
Space is limited to the first 45 guests, buy a ticket online today and reserve your spot!


Please note: Guest passes, 2-for-1 passes, reciprocal memberships, or any other special offers are not valid for special events at The Mennello Museum. Orlando Museum of Art Memberships are not transferable for entrance or special events at The Mennello Museum. 


An Art that Nature Makes

Friday, December 15 • Doors open at 4:30 p.m.; Movie starts at 6 p.m
Finding unexpected beauty in the discarded and decayed, photographer Rosamond Purcell has developed a body of work that has garnered international acclaim, graced the pages of National Geographic and over 20 published books, and has attracted admirers such as Jonathan Safran Foer, Errol Morris and Stephen Jay Gould. AN ART THAT NATURE MAKES details Purcell’s fascination with the natural world – from a mastodon tooth to a hydrocephalic skull – offering insight into her unique way of recontextualizing objects both ordinary and strange into sometimes disturbing but always breathtaking imagery.
Director: Molly Bernstein
Subjects: Art, Art History, Photography
Genres:  Documentary, Art
Type: Color
Year: 2016
Language: English
Length: 75 mins.

Alice Aycock: Waltzing Matilda and Twin Vortexes

Grounds for Exhibitions − Inaugural Outdoor Exhibitions Series
September 2016 through September 2018

The Mennello Museum inaugurates Grounds for Exhibitions with two large-scale works by American sculptor Alice Aycock installed in the Marilyn L. Mennello Sculpture Garden. The beautiful works, Waltzing Matilda and Twin Vortexes were originally part of series of seven sculptures in Aycock’s significant outdoor exhibition on Park Avenue in Manhattan entitled Park Avenue Paper Chase. Grounds for Exhibition features year-long large-scale sculpture exhibitions by nationally renowned American artists who otherwise would not be shared with Orlando audiences.

Shannon Fitzgerald states: “It is thrilling to inaugurate this outdoor exhibition program with such beautiful work by Alice Aycock, one of America’s most recognized and respected sculptors of her generation. I think visitors will delight in experiencing the stunning sculptures nestled in our lakeside landscape that challenges perspective, materiality, whimsy, and nature—in all its power and fragility.  She continues: “This is an extraordinary opportunity for our community to contemplate the vital role art has and the impact it can have when shared in the Public realm.”

 

The Beautiful Mysterious: The Extraordinary Gaze of William Eggleston

June 23 – September 3.

 

The Mennello Museum is pleased to present programs and events in conjunction with The Beautiful Mysterious: The Extraordinary Gaze of William Eggleston. Learn more.

Download the program flier.


The Mennello Museum of American Art presents the transcendental work of William Eggleston. Please join us for the opening reception on June 23, 2017. Learn more.

The Beautiful Mysterious: The Extraordinary Gaze of William Eggleston is guest curated by American novelist, Megan Abbott, and includes 36 color and black-and-white photographs from the University of Mississippi Museum’s remarkable permanent collection, including some photos never before exhibited.

William Eggleston, a renowned American photographer, is acclaimed for elevating color photography and transforming ordinary scenes into fine art. Through the eye of Eggleston, nothing is ordinary, despite his photographs’ apparent depiction of ordinary things and ordinary people doing ordinary things.  Eggleston once said, “I am at war with the obvious,” a phrase curators at the Metropolitan Museum of Art thought apt enough to use as the title for a 2013 exhibition of his photographs from their permanent collection

A Memphis native, Eggleston acquired his first camera in 1957 at age 18. During his time studying art at Ole Miss, his interest in photography grew. He soon began to experiment with color negative film. Today, Eggleston is a world-renowned innovator of color photography, transforming ordinary scenes into fine art.

The exhibition is organized by the University of Mississippi Museum, who owes its vast collection of Eggleston photographs to the generosity of Dr. William R. Ferris, scholar, author and founding director of the Center for the Study of Southern Culture, University of Mississippi who personally donated his collection to Ole Miss. Ferris, a photographer and longtime friend of Eggleston, describes him as “the greatest living color photographer.”  “He is the Picasso or Faulkner of what he does.” Ferris continues, “This exhibit allows everyone to know his work, which is part of the legacy of Ole Miss.”  Michael Glover, art critic for the British newspaper The Independent, agrees. His review of the 2013 opening of the permanent Eggleston installation at the Tate Modern was headlined, “Genius in colour: Why William Eggleston is the world’s greatest photographer.”

Greatest or not, art critics agree that Eggleston’s work has shaped art photography since 1976, when the Museum of Modern Art presented the now famous exhibition William Eggleston’s Guide, its first-ever solo exhibition of color photography.  Since that watershed exhibit, Eggleston’s work has influenced art photography and even filmmaking. Film directors citing his influence include John Huston, Gus Van Sant, Joel and Ethan Cohen and David Lynch.

It was Lynch who brought Eggleston to the attention of the exhibition’s guest curator, American novelist Megan Abbott, University of Mississippi’s 2013-2014 John and Renée Grisham Writer in Residence and an Edgar Award-winner.  Abbott has drawn her own inspiration from his photos for many of her novels. She helped choose the pieces for the exhibit, which capture scenes from more than two decades.  “To me, his photographs evoke entire worlds, not worlds we merely see, but worlds we feel, smell, touch,” she said. “When you look long enough at his photographs, like the gorgeous, lonely blue parking lot chosen as one of the exhibit’s central images, you get lost in it. You’re in another place.”  Acclaimed photographer, first cousin and Eggleston protégé Maude Schulyer Clay served as consulting adviser for the exhibit. In 2015, German photo book publisher Steidl produced a collection of Clay’s portraits titled Mississippi History. Steidl discovered her photographs while working with Eggleston on the multi-volume set Chrome (2011) and Los Alamos Revisited (2012).

Eggleston’s published books and portfolios, include Los Alamos (actually completed in 1974, before the publication of the Guide) the massive Election Eve (1976; a portfolio of photographs taken around Plains, Georgia before that year’s presidential election); The Morals of Vision (1978); Flowers (1978); Wedgwood Blue (1979); Seven (1979); Troubled Waters (1980); and The Louisiana Project (1980). William Eggleston’s Graceland (1984) is a series of commissioned photographs of Elvis Presley’s Graceland, depicting the singer’s home as an airless, windowless tomb in custom-made bad taste. Other series include The Democratic Forest (1989), Faulkner’s Mississippi (1990), and Ancient and Modern (1992).  In 2016, The Democratic Forest was presented in a solo exhibition at David Zwiner, New York with a new publication.

Of his 2013 Metropolitan Museum exhibition, At War with the Obvious, New York Times critic Ken Johnson writes “But photographs like Mr. Eggleston’s are not like movie images, which come in linear sequences, establishing explanatory narratives around scenes that would be mysterious, were they viewed in isolation.  There is no before and after here, so the photographs remain provocatively enigmatic, which accounts for much of their poetic resonance.  His pictures tease the mind, eliciting associations and possible meanings that swirl around them like bugs around a light bulb.”

In 2016, The New York Times Style Magazine featured Eggleston on the cover of the “Greats” edition, photographed by famed contemporary photographer Wolfgang Tillmans.  Writer Augusten Burroughs wrote “A visit with the American Master of color photography reveals him to be every bit as brilliant, confounding and heartbreakingly soulful as the pictures he makes.”

A clear spring rises somewhere on the home place, for the human strain begins there for Mr. Eggleston, and we see it in what follows: it turns into a river that runs through, or underneath, every place succeeding it.  Whatever is done to block it or stop its flow, it surfaces again.  Pure human nature proves itself in likely or unlikely places.

—Eudora Welty

William Eggleston, born in 1939 currently lives and works in Memphis, Tennessee.

The Beautiful Mysterious: The Extraordinary Gaze of William Eggleston is organized by the University of Mississippi Museum and Historic Houses with exhibition support provided by the Friends of the Museum. Additional support by Dr. William R. Ferris and the Eggleston Artistic Trust.

Art credit:
William Eggleston, Untitled, 1973, color photograph.
Collection of the University of Mississippi Museum and Historic Houses, gift of Dr. William R. Ferris.