All posts by aedwards

MENNELLO MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART FOUNDER MICHAEL A. MENNELLO PASSES AWAY

The City of Orlando, the Friends of the Mennello Museum of American Art, Mennello Museum Board of Trustees, and museum staff are deeply saddened to share that Michael A. Mennello passed away on December 18 due to COVID-19-related illness.

Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer expressed, “I am deeply saddened to hear about the passing of one of Orlando’s greatest supporters of the arts and generous philanthropists, Michael A. Mennello. Orlando would not be the cultural city it is today without Michael’s influence, enthusiasm and investment in the arts.  He has left a lasting legacy with his devotion and passion for generations to come and made our community a more diverse and creative place to live.”

Walter Ketcham, Vice President of the Friends Board of Directors, shared, “We lost a true icon in our community. The Friends of the Mennello Museum of American Art will continue our effort in supporting the museum in a way that both Marilyn and Michael Mennello would be proud of.”

Commissioner Robert F. Stuart expressed his condolences to the Mennello family and Michael’s many friends stating, “We are saddened by the passing of Michael Mennello and will continue to honor Michael and Marilyn’s appreciation of art and their love of this community.”

Shannon Fitzgerald, Executive Director, shared, “As we mourn the untimely loss of our Founder, Michael A. Mennello, we remain committed to sharing his and Marilyn’s love of art through the stewardship of their outstanding American Art collection and the many gifts they generously gave to our community. Michael envisioned a bright future for the museum and we have important work to continue in honoring that legacy.”

In lieu of flowers, the family requests those who wish to express sympathy and honor Michael’s memory donate to the Friends of the Mennello Museum’s “Building Our Future” campaign. Contributions may be sent to Friends of the Mennello Museum of American Art, 900 E. Princeton Street, Orlando, Florida 32832 or online at www.mennellomuseum.org/building-our-future/.

Votes For Women Exhibition

Votes For Women: A Portrait Of Persistence Virtual Exhibition


The Mennello Museum of American Art, a Smithsonian Affiliate Museum, is delighted to share the Smithsonian’s virtual and poster traveling exhibition entitled Votes For Women: A Portrait Of Persistence

The story of women’s suffrage is a story of voting rights, of inclusion in and exclusion from the franchise, and of our civic development as a nation. Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence, celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Nineteenth Amendment and explores the complexity of the women’s suffrage movement and the relevance of this history to Americans’ lives today.

Join us as we scroll and stroll through this special exhibition exploring the centennial of women’s suffrage with images and portraits reproduced from the National Portrait Gallery and Smithsonian Museum.

Scroll through the virtual exhibition below, available through the end of November.
or
Stroll through the free, in-person exhibition by visiting the Mennello Museum’s front porch, on display now through election day, from 11 am – 4 pm (weather permitting). 

Afterward, continue your exploration of history and meet voting-rights heroes with our neighbors at the Orlando Repertory Theatre. Their production of Eric Coble’s “Vote?,” is streaming directly to you, now through November 8. Learn more by visiting OrlandoRep.com.


Introduction

Women’s Voting Rights Originated in the Women’s Movement

Constitutional Arguments and Women’s Voting Rights

The Concept of Citizenship Seems Straightforward, but…

The New Woman

Equality is the Sacred Law of Humanity

Suffragists Were Political Geniuses

American Suffragists Had Courage

Suffrage Map

The 19th Amendment Was an Incomplete Victory


Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence is organized by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service in collaboration with the National Portrait Gallery. This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative.